Book Reviews


FEMALE AUTHORS



  • Bapsi Sidhwa's The Bride was published in 1997. It is the first English novel by Pakistan's first female English author.
Recommended for everyone who is a fan of post-partition literature/interested in descriptions of desi life/ looking forward to having detailed discussions about the treatment of women during the 50's and 60's in Pakistan. 


Recommended for everyone who is a fan of Pakistani literature/interested in depictions of religious minorities in Pakistan/ looking forward to having detailed discussions about strong female characters.  




  • Kamila Shamsie's Burnt Shadows was published in 2009. It was nominated for the Orange Prize for Fiction Shortlist (2009) and won the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award (2010). 
Recommended for everyone who is a fan of historical fiction/ interested in geopolitical change and its effects on the lives of people/looking for a serious, good read. 




  • Kanza Javed's Ashes, Wine and Dust was published in 2015. It was shortlisted for the Tibor Jones South Asia Prize.
Recommended for people who are interested in reading all the Pakistani female authors/supporting young writers/really interested in boring, moody protagonists.  


Recommended for everyone who is a fan of funny books/interested in novels which use media as a setting/ looking for a light, fun read. 


Recommended for people who are interested in pointless waffling/reading sentences that make no sense/need something to put them to sleep.   





Recommended for everyone who is a fan of romantic comedies/interested in novels which discuss relationships/in the mood for a book which is very desi in its themes. 







  • Uzma Aslam Khan's Thinner than Skin was published in 2010. It was nominated for the Man Asian Literary Prize (2012) and the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature (2014).
Recommended only for those who are interested in vague metaphorical references, pretentious writing and the complex demographics of Pakistan's northern areas. 





  • Zeenat Mahal's Haveli was published in 2013.
Recommended only for those who are interested in cheesy chick lit, cliched descriptions and mindless entertainment.  





MALE AUTHORS




  • Bilal Tanweer's The Scatter Here is Too Great was published in 2014. It was nominated for the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature (2015) and won the Shakti Bhatt First Book Prize (2014).
Recommended for everyone who is into reading multiple narratives, well defined characters and books about Karachi. 

  • Daniyal Mueenuddin's In Other Rooms, Other Wonders was published in 2009. It was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (2010) and National Book Award for Fiction (2009) among other awards, and won the The Story Prize (2009), Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best First Book in South Asia and Europe (2010) among other awards.
Recommended for everyone who is into short stories, historical fiction, and really, really pretentious writing. 





Recommended for people who want to read about Pakistan's history/are very confused about what people in the East are like/are looking for a black and white picture of Eastern religious sensibilities. 





  • H.M.Naqvi's Home Boy was published in 2009. It was nominated for the Shakti Bhatti First Book Prize (2010) and won the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature (2011).
Recommended for people who have travelled to New York/are studying for their GREs/wish to balance out the awesome books they’re reading with some mindless drivel.



Recommended for everyone who has not had any exposure to fiction located in Balochistan, and doesn't mind realistic/heartbreaking endings.




  • Mohammed Hanif's Our Lady of Alice Bhatti was published in 2011. It was nominated for the DCS Prize for South Asian Literature (2013) among other awards.
Recommended for everyone who is interested in literature about religious minorities, loves smart writing and is looking for something witty. 






  • Mohsin Hamid's A Beheading is a short story published in 2010 in Granta 112.
Recommended for everyone who loves short stories, doesn't mind blood and gore and has lived to regret speaking the truth. 





  • Musharraf Ali Farooqi's Between Clay and Dust was published in 2011. It was nominated for the Man Asian Literary Prize (2012) and for the DSC South Asian Literature Longlist (2013).
Recommended for everyone who loves post-partition stories, doesn't mind really short chapters and is interested in wrestlers or courtesans. 





Recommended for everyone who is a fan of Gabriel Garcia Marquez/magic realism/horror-fantasy cross overs. Also for those who haven't actually ever read the Pakistani version of magic realism. 





  • Omar Shahid Hamid's The Prisoner was published in 2013. It was nominated for the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature for Longlist (2015).
Recommended for everyone who wants to read a very honest account of how policemen learn to deal with a corrupt city.



  • Omar Shahid Hamid's The Spinner's Tale was published in 2015.

    • Recommended for those who are interested in cricket/really like thrillers and mysteries/want to read a book by a policeman who understands the city of Karachi.




    • Raza Rumi's Delhi by Heart: Impressions of a Pakistani Traveller was published in 2013.

      • Recommended for those who are interested in history/really like non-fiction and travelogues/want to read a book about the subcontinent and its past.

        Recommended for everyone who in interested in medical mysteries/has never read a book about Pakistani doctors/wants to engage in discussions about the representation of 9/11 in Pakistani books.





        Recommended for everyone who is into Sci-fi, plots which pass over your head and really interesting short story writing.  





        Recommended for everyone who is into speculative fiction, plots which once again pass over your head and really interesting (read: complicated) short story writing.